Transformers roll past Coast Guard, make semis

first_imgBREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. UP deserts UAAP CDC in protest We are young Even with a powered-down lineup Customs proved too much for sinking Coast Guard last night.Alyssa Valdez scored 14 points as Customs tinkered on the lineup and pulled off a 25-18, 25-12, 25-18 win over Coast Guard, to bag a semifinal slot in the Shakey’s V-League Reinforced Conference at Philsports Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas MOST READcenter_img BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town EDITORS’ PICK Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 “We’re really happy to win, this is a confidence-booster as we head to the semifinals,” said Valdez. “We still have to learn from our mistakes, the little things inside the court which make the difference at the end of the game.”BaliPure completed the semifinal cast after downing Laoag, 25-21, 26-24, 25-13, in the nightcap.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentCustoms coach Sherwin Meneses had the luxury of experimenting with his roster, resting his starters and giving others the chance to play.Thai import Kanjana Kuthaisong scored seven points, while Michiko Castaneda and Lilet Mabbayad added five hits a piece. Sam Dawson fired 11 points for Coast Guard, which also drew six markers from skipper Hazel Mea and five points from Michaella Caraan.But there was no stopping Customs guns, firing 36 spikes against 21 of Coast Guard. The Transformers had more blocks, 7-2, and aces, 9-7.Customs and BaliPure joined University of Santo Tomas and Pocari Sweat in the next round.Earlier, Air Force hacked out a 22-25, 25-22, 25-15, 25-21 triumph over Instituto Estetico Manila to move within a win of sweeping the eliminations in the Spikers’ Turf men’s volleyball.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

There’s now an app for mapping seagrass, the oceans’ great carbon sink

first_imgBiodiversity, Blue Carbon, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mapping, Marine, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Seagrass, Sedimentation, Technology, Wildtech A new online tool aims to crowdsource an image and location database of the world’s seagrass, in a bid to shed light on the threatened and fast-receding underwater flowering plants.Anyone with a camera and internet access can upload images of seagrass beds and location info to SeagrassSpotter, available on desktop and mobile apps.Project Seagrass, the group behind the mapping tool, hopes it will help countries that are seagrass hotspots but lacking data, like Indonesia, to improve efforts to conserve these vitally important carbon sinks.Globally, the group hopes to obtain at least 100,000 records by engaging people from all around the world to collect data about seagrass in their locality. All collected data will be made freely available. The launch of an online crowdsourcing database for seagrass hopes to breathe new life into efforts to conserve the underwater flowering plants, which act as both important habitats for marine species and a major store of carbon dioxide.Patchy mapping of seagrass meadows has hampered efforts to protect the plants (which are distinct from seaweed) from threats such as coastal development, sedimentation, coral farming and sand mining, according to Richard Unsworth, a marine biologist at Swansea University in the U.K. and co-founder of environmental charity Project Seagrass.The group on June 4 launched SeagrassSpotter, a collaborative initiative that allows anyone with a camera to upload images of seagrass sightings and tagged locations from anywhere in the world. The online tool also provides species information to help ordinary users identify the seagrass they find. The platform is accessible via website or mobile app for Android and iOS.“We’re asking people visiting the coast or going out to sea — for diving, fishing, kayaking — to keep their eyes out for seagrass so that they can take a picture [to] upload to our website,” Unsworth told Mongabay. “The more people that get involved the more likely we are to develop a better understanding of the world’s seagrass.”Seagrass meadows are often ignored in marine conservation efforts, but they are important ecosystems for marine animals. Image by P. Lindgren/Wikimedia Commons.Seagrasses grow in shallow coastal regions, providing a crucial nursery habitat for young fish of many species. Previous reports suggest that more than 600 species of fish in Southeast Asia alone rely on these meadows for their growth and development. Seagrass beds are also an important home for marine invertebrates, such as sea cucumbers, prawns and crabs.Some seagrass meadows also serve to store large quantities of so-called blue carbon, the carbon dioxide absorbed by the world’s oceans and coastal ecosystems. It’s been estimated that seagrass meadows may be able to store more CO2 in their roots than all the world’s rainforests.The online tool SeagrassSpotter aggregates reported sightings of seagrass ecosystems from around the world to help in the effort to conserve the underwater plants. Image courtesy of SeagrassSpotter. Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The platform also provides information on seagrass species to help with identification. Image courtesy of SeagrassSpotter.Seagrasses are disappearing at rates that rival those of coral reefs and tropical rainforests, losing as much as 7 percent of their area each year, according to the IUCN. More than 70 species of seagrass worldwide cover a global area estimated at up to 600,000 square kilometers (about 232,000 square miles) — an area larger than the island of Madagascar.“We increasingly know how seagrasses support biodiverse fauna but we know little about how to manage them to be resilient into the future and how to restore these systems once they’ve been lost,” Unsworth said.He pointed to Indonesia as an example of a seagrass hotspot, where the dearth of knowledge about the plants could potentially lead to the extinction of these underwater gardens across the archipelago.Indonesia is widely considered an important country for seagrass conservation. In 1994, researchers estimated the country was home to 30,000 square kilometers (11,600 square miles) of seagrass, perhaps the world’s largest concentration of the plant. But in June 2017, the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), a government-funded research agency, put the country’s seagrass cover at just 1,507 square kilometers (582 square miles).“Having worked extensively on seagrass in Indonesia since 2003, I see that seagrass is largely not on the conservation radar,” Unsworth said.“When you visit marine parks and places with seagrass, its conservation is commonly not included or just there as a token inclusion. The focus is always on coral reefs, even though often the majority of the fishing effort is on nearshore shallow seagrass.”At least two studies by researchers in Indonesia have attempted to map seagrass meadows in certain locations, but both noted that nationwide mapping efforts were practically non-existent.A handful of seagrass meadow sightings in Indonesia have been submitted to SeagrassSpotter. Image courtesy of SeagrassSpotter.According to Unsworth, LIPI now runs a seagrass monitoring program, but it’s only on seagrass meadows in marine parks where threats aren’t as prevalent and widespread as in other, unprotected, coastal regions in Indonesia.“Funding for projects by NGOs largely ignores seagrass or when budgets are stretched, they always pull the seagrass component first,” he said. “Having met with fisheries officers, park managers and local government officials over many years, my overwhelming opinion is that seagrass is not considered to be of much importance.”A search of the academic literature on coral reefs versus seagrass in Indonesia reveals that five times as many studies published about the former than the latter in the period between 1970 and 2018, Unsworth said.He also pointed to dataset compiled by the U.N. Environment Programme’s World Conservation Monitoring Centre showing huge gaps where seagrass has been mapped.“The gaps are places where the environmental conditions suggest seagrass should be prevalent,” Unsworth said. “This includes many areas where I personally have observed extensive seagrass, such as Buton, Selayar, Central Sulawesi.”The latest figures from LIPI indicate that only 40 percent of seagrass in Indonesia is considered in healthy condition. Coastal land development, sedimentation, waste pollution, coral aquaculture and sand mining are the top threats to Indonesia’s seagrass.Unsworth and his team of researchers published a report in April that indicates 90 percent of the seagrass meadows they examined in Indonesia had been extensively damaged and degraded over the past five years.“Seagrasses in some parts of Indonesia are very well mapped, but across the nation knowledge is very poor and this comes at an important time given what we know about the losses of seagrass,” he said.Other countries, like Australia, have also reported findings of extensive seagrass meadows in seabeds deeper than 20 meters (66 feet), but “next to no deepwater seagrass has ever been documented in Indonesia,” Unsworth said.“This is probably because no one has ever looked for it,” he said.To date, SeagrassSpotter has collected more than 1,000 records of seagrass around the U.K. and northern Europe. Globally, the group hopes to obtain at least 100,000 records by engaging people from around the world to collect data about seagrass in their locality. All collected data will be freely available to the public.“If people don’t know where seagrass is and why it’s of value,” Unsworth said, “then they won’t take action to preserve it.”Healthy seagrass on the ocean floor. Seagrass provides an important source of income and food for communities around the world, but its importance often goes unnoticed. Image courtesy of Benjamin Jones/Project Seagrass.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Top forestry official out in Malaysia

first_imgAccording to press reports, Datuk Sam Mannan will be removed from his role as head of the Sabah Forestry Department.Mannan’s reign as Sabah’s top forestry official was not without controversy.Often blunt and outspoken toward critics, he aggravated timber companies — and won accolades from conservationists — by converting hundreds of thousands of hectares of rainforest in forestry concessions into permanent forest reserves, making them off-limits from logging.It’s unclear where Mannan will end up — reached by Mongabay, Mannan did not offer comment about his departure or plans — but it’s not the first time he has left the directorship. A top official is out of his post as head of Sabah’s forestry department, which oversees forests in the Malaysian state on the island of Borneo.According to press reports, Datuk Sam Mannan will be removed from his role as head of the Sabah Forestry Department. No reason has been given for the action, but the director had been slated to step down. The Star reports that Mannan was given “three months’ notice effective Aug 1.”The news follows revelations that Sabah’s former Chief Miniser Musa Aman is being investigated by Malaysia Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) in the aftermath of his party’s poor showing in Malaysia’s May general election. Aman lost his position in June when Sabah’s state assembly backed rival Shafie Apdal as Chief Minister. Mannan served under Aman since 2003.Mannan’s reign as Sabah’s top forestry official was not without controversy itself. Often blunt and outspoken toward critics, he aggravated timber companies — and won accolades from conservationists — by converting hundreds of thousands of hectares of rainforest in forestry concessions into permanent forest reserves, making them off-limits from logging and safeguarding them for Sabah’s endangered species like orangutans and pygmy elephants. He angered environmentalists — but pleased palm oil companies — by re-zoning nearly 100,000 hectares of degraded forest land for oil palm plantations. He drew the ire of local community groups with what they saw as harsh crackdowns on forest “encroachers”, but won recognition internationally for his willingness to experiment with new approaches to tropical forest management, including biobanking at Malua and tropical timber certification at places like Deramakot.Sabah is home of one of the largest populations of endangered orangutans in the world. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Mannan said he managed Sabah’s forests with one overarching objective: sustainability. But sustainability in his eyes meant both protecting “good” forests — as he termed areas that while selectively logged, still afforded suitable wildlife habitat — and maintaining the economic sustainability of the state’s massive Yayasan Sabah concession, which by design was intended to fund social programs for its citizens into perpetuity. These goals were made more difficult by rapacious logging in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, which both destroyed vast areas of primary rainforest and undermined timber productivity, sending revenues into a tailspin. The political pressures that created and enabled those conditions persisted throughout Mannan’s time at the department.It’s unclear where Mannan will end up — reached by Mongabay, Mannan did not offer comment about his departure or plans — but it’s not the first time he has left the directorship. In the late 1990s Mannan was relieved of his post by Sabah’s chief minister when he objected to a massive logging scheme that would have converted 300,000 hectares of forest into acacia plantations. That project, which came at a great cost to Sabah’s rainforests, ultimately proved to be a fraud: vast areas of forest was cleared but the acacia plantations were never developed, vindicating Mannan’s suspicions.Rainforest in Sabah. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Article published by Rhett Butler Conservation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Latam Eco Review: Gold fever in Peru and cryptic fish from the deep

first_imgThe most popular stories from our Spanish-language service, Mongabay-Latam, followed new deforestation from gold mining in Peru, new fish species deep in Chile’s sea, mining on Ecuador’s beaches, and hundreds of dead turtles in Mexico.Gold mining tears through Peru’s AmazonA new study shows that gold mining in Peru’s Madre de Dios region has cleared more forest than originally estimated: 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) in 2017 alone. Since 1985, more than 950 square kilometers (367 square miles) have been lost. Most of the deforestation in the last 32 years occurred in the buffer zones of three protected areas.Sites mined with mercury, many of them abandoned without any attempt at environmental rehabilitation, scar a 20-kilometer (12-mile) stretch of the Madre de Dios forest. Image by Vanessa Romo/Mongabay Latam.Atacama Trench: New species observed in Pacific depths of Chilean coastGelatinous fish, scavenger crustaceans, octopuses and strange worms have been seen for the first time, 8 kilometers (5 miles) deep in the most extensive trench in the world along the Peruvian and Chilean coasts. This year, for the first time, an expedition reached the bottom by sending a robot to take samples from this unknown abyss.One of the species found in the Atacama Trench. Image courtesy of the Millennium Institute of Oceanography.Mining the metallic sands of Ecuador’s beachesMining concessions have taken over the black sands of Playa Negra in Ecuador’s Esmeraldas province. The mining of the metallic sand in search of iron and titanium is happening on beach zones that buffer protected areas. There are eight such concessions on the beaches of three of Ecuador’s Pacific provinces.Ecuador’s Environment Ministry has ordered a halt to all mining on Playa Negra. Image courtesy of the Mompiche Commune.Hundreds of turtles die in nets off MexicoAlmost 400 sea turtles found dead and rotting on the western coast of Mexico in April were caught in abandoned, illegal nets, a crime that carries a jail sentence of up to nine years. Mexico is the site of the most important sea turtle nesting beaches in the world. Juan Carlos Cantú, head of the Mexican program of the Defenders of Wildlife, says such accidental capture, illegal capture for their meat, and taking of their eggs in nesting season are now the biggest threats to sea turtles.Turtles coming to shore in La Flor-San Juan del Sur Wildlife Refuge in Nicaragua. Image courtesy of Paso Pacifico.Peruvian indigenous group uses an app to fight miningMembers of the Masenawa indigenous community in Peru’s Amazon documented the presence of an illegal mining camp through a mobile app called ForestLink, developed by the Rainforest Foundation UK. Once a group that works with the community had evidence that the miners were working in a zone close to the Amarakaeri communal reserve in the south of Manu National Park, they shared the information with government officials.Police responded to the reports of illegal mining, one of the main threats to the communities and biodiversity of Madre de Dios, by destroying heavy equipment and arresting five suspects. Image by FENAMAD.Read all these stories in full at Mongabay-Latam in Spanish here. Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Illegal Mining, Mining, New Species, Rainforests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cloud seeding bears no rain in Sri Lanka

first_imgClimate Change, Drought, Energy, Environment, Technology, Water, Water Crisis Article published by dilrukshi Banner image: Maskeliya reservoir, also known as Mausakelle, where a cloud seeding experiment was carried out on March 22, 2019. Image by  Rehman Abubakr via Wikimedia Commons. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored An experimental attempt by Sri Lanka to induce artificial rain amid a prolonged drought fell short of expectations when the anticipated rain materialized a day late.Despite the setback, the government appears committed to exploring the technology further as it seeks to address power cuts caused by low water levels in its hydropower reservoirs.Scientists have called for comprehensive studies on cloud microphysics, meteorology and observational studies to ensure that such an expensive endeavor is backed by adequate scientific data.With no cost-benefit analysis, climatologists fear that artificial rainmaking may cause adverse impacts over the long term. A recent attempt to induce rain amid a prolonged drought in Sri Lanka has fallen short, but that hasn’t stopped the government from embracing the project, to the dismay of scientists who have urged greater studies into the technology and its long-term impacts.The drought conditions have brought soaring temperatures and regular power cuts in a country where about 8 percent of electricity comes from hydropower. These conditions have frayed the public mood, and the power crisis is expected to continue as water levels in the hydropower reservoirs remain low.To trigger rains in the catchment areas that feed the dams, the government recently carried out an rainmaking experiment. Though it recorded only marginal success, with the results now under review, the government is looking to adopt the technology as part of its long-term solutions, including creating a department for artificial rainmaking under the Ministry of Power and Energy.“We require more rain to meet the country’s hydropower requirement,” Sulakshana Jayawardena, spokesman for the Ministry of Power and Energy and Business Development, told Mongabay.He said Sri Lanka had experienced severe drought conditions in the past two years, with many catchment areas not receiving adequate rain to generate sufficient hydropower. Jayawardena said the reservoirs were only filled up to about 50 percent of their capacity.“We had to explore artificial rainmaking. The annual average rainfall of 2,000 mm [79 inches] is completely insufficient to meet the demand for power,” he said.And the electricity board is keen to avoid the costly exercise of thermal power generation, which accounts for 91 percent of the country’s electricity. Just under half of that comes from burning coal, with the rest from oil. “When there’s limited capacity to generate hydropower, we resort to expensive power purchasing from the private sector,” Jayawardena said. “Besides being expensive, it does not offer a long-term solution.”Jayawardena said generating thermal power cost the state about 12 times as much as hydropower per unit of energy. As such, the government is likely to pursue more rainmaking exercises, he said.But the failed attempt at rainmaking has drawn criticism, with experts calling for scientific assessments before long-term programs are envisaged.Lareef Zubair, a climate scientist dubbed artificial rainmaking an “unproven technology,” and called for comprehensive research on cloud microphysics, meteorology and observational studies.“Let’s first take a holistic look at things,” he said.An expert committee that looked into the rainmaking initiative has called for a better monitoring system and catchment conservation, before making big decisions. Concerns have also been expressed abut poor management of rainfall, with experts saying that Sri Lanka has failed to make maximum use of rain received.Ranjith Punyawardene, principal climatologist at the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Peradeniya has also called for a complete cost-benefit analysis coupled with an environmental impact assessment before undertaking any expensive rainmaking exercise.Meanwhile, Kapila Jayasinghe, chief engineer of the state-owned utility, Ceylon Electricity Board, ruled out any long-term side effects from cloud triggering, citing a past attempt at artificial rainmaking in the 1980s.“The initial feasibility has been concluded and now it is about making a national plan and implementing it,” he said.The process of cloud seeding involves spraying specific chemicals to induce rain. Graphic by Karthik Chandramouli/Mongabay.Late rainThe rainmaking experiment took place March 22, with a Sri Lanka Air Force plane spraying chemicals onto clouds above the Maussakelle reservoir in Central province.The previous month, a team had been sent to study artificial rainmaking at Thailand’s Department of Royal Rainmaking and Agricultural Aviation, comprising officials from the Air Force, the CEB, and the departments of meteorology and irrigation.During the experiment, assisted by engineers from Thailand, the rainmakers expected an artificially created downpour over the catchment area later the same day. However, rainfall observed from satellites and in the nearby area of Norwood indicated that the rain occurred the following day, March 23.The Thai experts determined it was still possible to generate artificial rain in Sri Lanka, provided certain environmental conditions were met, top sources from the energy ministry told Mongabay. The source said the team working on the technology had been sent back to the drawing board to gather more atmospheric data before more experiments can be carried out.Meanwhile, Buddhi Marambe, professor of crop science at the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Peradeniya and chairperson, national experts committee on climate adaptation said there should be sufficient checks and balances if rainmaking is to become a long-term program to address the island’s energy crisis.Marambe told Mongabay that it is important to further study rainmaking, if the country intends continuing with more experiments.“If the experiments continue, then certain types of chemicals commonly used for rainmaking, are likely to impact soil and plants. The process also creates cumulonimbus, known as ‘rain clouds.’  Triggering such clouds is expected to trigger high intensity rainfall.  This could result in increasing rainfall in the catchment areas but likely to also result in severe soil erosion in the same areas due to the intensity,” he said.last_img read more